parquet courts

Parquet Courts release new song from upcoming EP out on 10.08

One of the latest bands to break out of the Brooklyn DIY scene, Parquet Courts had a pretty fabulous 2013 this far - their debut album "Light Up Gold" received a "Best New Music" tag from Pitchfork late last year, which propelled the band's popularity and sent them touring for much of the current year. Also, the band as of late obviously eat and enjoyed a lot of junk food - as you can see in all their press pictures. To cash in on the current surge of popularity (and therefore invest in more junk food), the band is about to release a new EP in October, entitled "Tally All the Things that you Broke." Check out the preview track "You've Got Me Wonderin' Now," streaming below.

We added this song to The Deli's playlist of Best NYC songs by emerging NYC artists - check it out!

   

NYC bands at 4Knots: Hunters, Parquet Courts, Heliotropes, The Babies

For a third consecutive year at its present South Street Seaport location, the 4Knots music fest continues to highlight New York City’s free summertime music season. Taking place on Saturday June 29 from 1-8 pm, local homegrown talent is fully represented once again this year, with 3 bands (The BabiesHunters and Parquet Courts) not too recently highlighted by The Deli as NYC Album of the Month.

Brooklyn’s noise rock duo Hunters are one of the most dynamic and exciting live bands out there. Guitar guru Derek Watson’s tonal quality and rhythmic style fluctuates between the tangled jungle stomp of The Cramps and all out mayhem of Sonic Youth. Lead vocalist Isabel Almeida twists and contorts her pliable limbs as she purrs and coos about deadbeats and acid trips.

Parquet Courts have come to embody the disenchanted vibe of today’s slacker generation. Their full-length LP “Light Up Gold” (blessed by a Pitchfork 'Best New Music" tag) takes on the post-punk, indie rock vibe in a loose and jammy way. Tightly honed rhythms lay the groundwork for a more rambling style of guitar fretwork. Their lyrics skewer towards recognizable observation over obscure metaphors.

Brooklyn's Heliotropes have been extremely busy over the last few months. Having just released their debut full length record “A Constant Sea” to critical acclaim, the band continues to play significant showcases, culminating with their appearances at this very festival. The heavier aspects of their sound has gotten a lot of deserved attention, however their album also reveals a softer side. Tracks like “Everyone Else” and “Awake” emphasize stark vocals with acoustic guitar accompaniment, as opposed to any kind of explosive guitar bombast. Deeper cut “Moonlite” features violin string textures.

The whole day event will be headlined by Philly's own Kurt Vile & the Violators and will also include performances by other more established locals rockers The MenThe Babies and Marnie Stern. - Dave Cromwell

   

NYC Album of the Month: Parquet Courts' "Light Up Gold"

Touchstones come easily for Parquet Courts. While a lot of Brooklyn bands try desperately to shed historical reference, songwriters Austin Brown and A. Savage seem to revel in finding common ground with those that have come before them. Doing their homework, they've managed to flirt heavily with the noise-rock expectations of Sonic Youth, the late, angular punk of The Stranglers, and the slacker torch passed over from Pavement for their much-discussed LP 'Light Up Gold.'

But there's also something uniquely New York in how they've channeled their frustrations through punk freakouts in 'Master of My Craft,' or when they're talking about nothing in the universal truths of 'Donuts Only.' This is part of a timeless link in a chain heading back to Velvet Underground, but cutting its teeth in the grunge noise of the '90s. Parquet Courts placed in 77th position in our recent Year End Poll for Emerging NYC bands, and also thanks to their energetic and tight live show got a lot of buzz going last week at SXSW. See them play with Iceage, April 20th at Bowery Ballroom. - Mike Levine @Goldnuggets)

This song was added to our SoundCloud playlist of emerging NYC artists here.

   

Parquet Courts

CD Name: 
Light Up Gold
title_color: 
RoyalBlue
Music Link: 
https://soundcloud.com/parquet-courts
Album Cover URL: 
https://i3.sndcdn.com/artworks-000035950810-6lff5u-t200x200.jpg
body: 
<p>Touchstones come easily for&nbsp;<a href="http://dulltools.bandcamp.com/album/light-up-gold" target="_Blank">Parquet Courts</a>. While a lot of Brooklyn bands try desperately to shed historical reference, songwriters Austin Brown and A. Savage seem to revel in finding common ground with those that have come before them. Doing their homework, they've managed to flirt heavily with the noise-rock expectations of Sonic Youth, the late, angular punk of The Stranglers, and the slacker torch passed over from Pavement for their much-discussed LP 'Light Up Gold.'</p> <p>But there's also something uniquely New York in how they've channeled their frustrations through punk freakouts in 'Master of My Craft,' or when they're talking about nothing in the universal truths of 'Donuts Only.' This is part of a timeless link in a chain heading back to Velvet Underground, but cutting its teeth in the grunge noise of the '90s. <em>-&nbsp;Mike Levine @Goldnuggets)</em></p> <p><iframe src="https://embed.spotify.com/?uri=spotify:album:7wPMMpyR54VqwOPendewUq" width="172" height="200" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true"></iframe></p>
   

Parquet Courts to release a first full-length album

Now that I've got the story straight, Parquet Courts is a NYC-based 'three-quarter Texan' four-piece, one member of which (Andrew) is also part of Fergus&Geronimo, another (Austin) of The Keepsies. The thing about their first album 'Light Up Gold' is that sure, they haven't exactly tried to reinvent the wheel, but see, I've played it over the last week or so more times than I'll admit; ergo it's about time to spread the word.

On one side, there are the many influences of punk & co they've squeezed into these ten tracks each more nonchalantly catchy than the next, which range from Buzzcocks-style fuzzy pop-punk to groovy post-punk and stoner-folk-...well, punk, excuse the repetition. On the other, there's the lyrical appeal of these contemporary flâneurs wandering 'Stoned and Starving' the streets of NYC, who translate their observations, experiences and social critiques as mundane as they may be into prose poetry, in the simple subjective flow of some 60s Beat and New Journalism writers. That's two thumbs up in my books. Released on Saturday (8.18) via Dull Tools, 'Light Up Gold' will be welcomed with a show that same evening at Death By Audio. - Tracy Mamoun