Alt Pop

Jonathan Something displays vintage panache in new video “I Tried To Lose You But I Don’t Know How”

There’s something endearing about nakedly bearing one’s heart on your sleeve, and Jonathan Something captures a bygone 80s pre-sadboy bravado in new video “I Tried To lose You But I Don’t Know How.” Forlorn melody and plucky Yamaha synths bring a vintage aesthetic to the forefront (as does the quasi-VHS grain of the visuals), but Something really sells it in his panache, both in physical movement and vocal prowess; his pop vocal delivery occupies the liminal space between camp and classic, equally evocative of both James Murphy and George Michael. Tongue in cheek and deceptively catchy, watch the video below, and stream his new record Cannibal House Rules, out now via Solitaire Recordings. Photo by Mike Boyle

   

Abigail Ory debuts fiery single "Waves"

To a sultry and dangerous blues crawl, Boston’s Abigail Ory enters, drenched in a hot and sticky passion few times encountered in music and elsewhere: the singer/songwriter’s latest single “Waves” is a milky sonic sea to bathe in. The heart-beat bass, the fuzzy electric guitar strums, and Ory’s velvety vocals all ignite the unison shifts that give life and edge to the track, fit for the most underground of clubs, for the best places to catch an evening-altering song. In “Waves,” Ory shows, at a young age, a maturity that separates her from the current crop of indie-pop artists, selecting with care influences beyond the available palette. Stream “Waves” below for a dramatic exit from the week, for a fiery entrance into the weekend. - Rene Cobar

   

PREMIERE: Local Nomad's "Summertime" reminisces on seasons past

It’s not uncommon during periods of stress or uncertainty to regress, or at the very least, imagine some sort of hypothetical bygone age viewed through rose-tinted goggles. Such feverish daydreams are the center of Local Nomad’s new single “Summertime,” a sweltering electro-pop jam that recalls the childlike joys of playing baseball during the warmer months. With synth leads evocative of 80s new wave paired with contemporary, progressive songwriting, multi-instrumentalist Michael Desmond is certainly looking towards the past — though the groove is never overwhelmed by a perverse sense of nostalgia. Rather, Local Nomad’s recollections stay grounded and realistic, letting the track’s vivid memories play off its colorful keys and dynamic vocal performances, in the end crafting a misty, escapist banger for what feels like a ‘lost’ summer — give it a listen below, and be sure to stream the project's self-titled EP, out tomorrow.
 

   

Delaney is not afraid to mix it up in new record "A Small Remaining Quantity of Something"

Manchester, New Hampshire, group Delaney has a new record that explodes with all the emocore goodness you desire for a celebratory weekend. A Small Remaining Quantity of Something contains tracks like “The Ghost of Better Times,” which pops with mighty harmonizing choruses, drum fills for days and even atmospheric breaks for a breather before the mosh madness. The group goes beyond the garage aesthetic with layered tracks like “Thief,” which add piano embellishments to back the melodic vocals, soaked in melancholy, and, yes, the song erupts too. “Broken” is no-holds-barred rock and roll, showcasing the versatility that has always made emocore a beloved and seemingly unforgettable music genre. For a weekend to remember stream A Small Remaining Quantity of Something below. - Rene Cobar

   

Hollow River has fun with confessions in new single "Known To Lie"

Mark MacDonald, also known as Hollow River, has released a single slippery-fun that flows beautifully and crashes with alternative rock power. “Known To Lie” has a turn-of-the-millennium sonic innocence to it, in the alt-rock, power pop style of groups like Smash Mouth: the music makes you feel good, maybe like partying. MacDonald flows in each verse with plentiful charisma and allows for revved up electric guitars to do the rest of the talking when the choruses arrive. For a summer hit, the music and its theme should be an anthemic escape from the weight of the prior seasons, “Known To Lie” fits that criteria. Another weekend arrives in an unusual 2020, stream “Known To Lie” to get through it with a gleeful smile. - Rene Cobar, photo by Sergio P.