Folk/Country

I'm Here for the BOOs: Nashville's Halloween Playlist

Get tipsy off pumpkin beer? Check.
Watch Hocus Pocus and re-realize how awesome it is? Check.
Stress over the whole couples-costume thing? Check.
 

Create a totally badass Halloween playlist featuring some of my favorite local bands? CHECK.


Get in the spirit and give it a listen! -Caroline Bowman

 

   

Portland band, Towering Trees, plays first show in six months tonight at Kelly's Olympian

Towering Trees, a band of four from Portland, Oregon, make music they describe as, “contemporary snake charming,” but "indie rock with roots influences" is quite appropriate too. Their first album, “Hangover Hearts,” released in 2013, is a compilation of the band's best qualities: warming vocals, jangly electric guitar, and ardent melodrama. A good example of this is their track “Misfortune.” The song starts out with a plucked guitar melody that pierces through the steady percussion undercurrent, while the vocals, “I feel so sick, I feel so weak,” oscillate above the instrumentation, sounding almost like a whine. Towering Trees will be playing tonight at Kelly’s Olympian for the first time in six months! If you can’t make it, or don’t live in Portland, give their Kickstarter-funded album a listen on Bandcamp. - Isabel Rolston

   

Emily Neveu Supports Emily Wells at The Chapel - 10/21

The San Francisco based sensuous and broody singer songwriter, Emily Neveu will be performing tomorrow night at The Chapel in support of the popular multi instrumentalist, Emily Wells. This is a great pairing for an evening of penetrating avant folk music. We highly recommend you head out to this show and get a full dose of two highly talented artists!

   

Portland folk band Windus plays Mississippi Studios on 11.19

Here at The Deli we try to reward artists that dare to forge new, interesting sounds, and Portland duo Windus definitely belongs to this category, at least in this 2014 single "Peninsula" from their debut, self titled EP. We love the stripped down intensity, minimalistic melodies and textural elements coming and going in waves. The rest of the records settles for a more regular folk sound, but always keeping the intensity and poetry on. You can see Windus live at Mississippi Studios on 11.19.

   

Zach's CMJ Day 3: Second Child, Ezra Furman, The Grasping Straws, and French Horn Rebellion

Wednesday night at The Bitter End in the West Village started with the understated majesty of New York/Philadelphia quartet Second Child (pictured). Playing warm, folk-inflected songs that found notable beauty with the harmonizing of lead singer Alex DeSimine and bassist Alex Tremitiere, the band subtly moved the listener but didn't forget to straight-up thrill; their funked-up cover of David Bowie's "Fame" enlivened the previously focused crowd, several hoots and shouts flying out. While Dirty Projectors are probably more similar to them, it's exciting to see that Second Child can get loose like The Thin White Duke did on some of his earlier tracks. At Le Poisson Rouge, Oakland/Chicago rocker Ezra Furman finished his set with a gloriously riotous rendition of Arcade Fire's "Crown of Love," the gradual nature of that 'Funeral' standout reverting into sax-backed wildness and the green-haired Furman's lightning-quick guitar picks. Back at the End, New York four-piece The Grasping Straws drifted into slow, drum-marched songs that, particularly with frontwoman Mallory Feuer's drawn-out and bluesy vocals, recalled the lo-fi glory of early Cat Power. Taking their time rather than rushing towards easy shock, these tracks intrigued with their very patience and calm and, perhaps most importantly, were ultimately moving, their tumbling quality enabling the audience to both engage and reflect. Down on the Lower East Side, Brooklyn's French Horn Rebellion sent the evening out with feel-good dance tracks full of both jittering electronics and rubbery horns. Brothers Robert Perlick-Molinari and David Perlick-Molinari wore matching Glasslands T-shirts and, with their hip sways and head bobs, they seemed to throw a party not just for that lost venue but for the institution of live music itself. - Zach Weg