Folk/Country

Y La Bamba Ignites at the Scoot Inn

 


An eclectic bill featuring Y La Bamba and Durand Jones and the Indications sold out and packed in a crowd of lovers at Scoot Inn on Friday night.

 

Luz Elena Mendoza gracefully leads the indie-encompassing folk group, Y La Bamba. Established in 2008, the band released their latest album, Entre Los Dos, in fall 2019. Menodza dances like a black flame on stage - with each cha cha step she moves with magic and belongs to herself, an embodiment of her music and experience. The musicians surrounding her are just as beautiful, all alive in their eyes. The sound is mystical, and performed with a tacit invitation to engage in the spiritual healing of their music.

 

The indie rock and latin infused sounds of the album are a fertile landscape for Mendoza’s songwriting. The lyrics unwind the way good poetry transcends. There may be added mystery to the bilingual lyricism, especially if the listener doesn’t know Spanish. From the album’s namesake song, “Entre Los Dos,” Mendzoa longs, “y yo me saltaré de mi ventana/y la muerte ahí me espera con otra vida” [“and I will throw myself out my window/and death waits for me there with another life”].  Although the poetic lyrics are somber, the sound is zestful, delivering a juicy juxtaposition of emotions.

 

Paloma Negra,” [“Black Dove”] from the Mujeres single from 2018, had the everyone aye-aye-ing and ooh-oohing. Another song that embodies Mendoza’s divine feminine energy balanced with dark motifs and jovial affirmations: “Voy lentamente pero bien segura” [“I go slowly but very sure”]. Would you like a taste? Y La Bamba’s Tiny Desk Concert features “Paloma Negra” as the first song. Or, just see them when they come back through Austin, destined to play a headlining bill of their own on a larger stage with another enthralled crowd.

 

-Melissa Green

   

Silverware releases video for “Finish Line”

San Francisco-based Silverware is led by Ainsley Wagoner, a native Kentuckian whose roots infiltrate her songs. Her sound is inspired by Appalachian sparseness and is layered with electric guitars, synths, and ethereal vocals. Her new video for “Finish Line” came out last month and we’re glad to share the dancing joy. -Lucille Faulkner

Silverware - Finish Line | Music Video from Ainsley Wagoner on Vimeo.

   

The Keener Family

The Keener Family released their debut album, Tender Beast, back in December. This is the Psych Country sound of Christopher Keener along with an array of friends including Aubrey Ann Howard, Taylor Bacon, Robbie Hamilton, Robby Haynes, and more.

The album’s lead single is called “Raised on The Roar” and is accompanied by the mousetrap video below.

 

   

Field Guides’ new LP hazily recollects, plays Mercury Lounge 2.9

The various moving parts that come together on This Is Just A Place, the latest offering by Brooklyn collective Field Guides, create a verdant mix of folk and dream-pop, creating music that feels both grounded and distant. Single “Guessing at Animals” provides a wide open space for bandleader Benedict Kupstas to experiment, his narrative baritone centerstage, waxing nostalgically, buttressed by layers of interweaving, echoing guitars and the occasional sax line. It is this very synthesis of hazy instrumental backgrounds and Kupstas’ prescient songwriting that provides Field Guides with its greatest strengths, a release that’s drawn from human experience but presented as if viewed by some omniscient narrator, looking down from space — softly recollective tunes for recounting the past through rose-colored glasses. Listen to it below, and catch Field Guides on February 9th at the Mercury Lounge with Onlyness and Rose Blanshei. —Connor Beckett McInerney

   

From the Submissions: The Paris Buns' " Charm (Metromania I)"

It’s impossible to ignore the influence John Darnielle has on songwriter (and erstwhile Deli NYC contributor) Will Sisskind. Similar vocal cadences aside, his music under the Paris Buns moniker charts its own course on Charm (Metromania I), the first in a year-long series of emotively-inspired EPs. Backed by barebones electric drums and minimalistic synth contributions, Sisskind sings about the role charm itself plays in disparate social settings, whetherits inconsequential flirtatious banter (“Sphallolia”) or the inclination to smile in social settings (“The Eccedentestiast”). Verbose, prose-filled odes paired with driving acoustic guitar make for a unique effort that showcases the Paris Buns as a daredevil songwriting act that’s perfect for fans of the Mountain Goats or AJJ — give it a listen below.