Folk/Country

Wildfires is the Austin Deli's Artist of the Month

Yet another poll hath gone, and the people have spoken: Wildfires is your Austin Deli Artist of the Month, coming in hard with a big push in the last few days that rocketed them straight into first. We've got a pretty good idea where Wildfires' roaring race to the win got its fuel, as this dreamy and deceptively-named indie outfit had a recent EP release at Cheer Up Charlies on March 11. Wildfires has transitioned over the years from a more acoustic-heavy American roots sound to poppy indie with a hazey shoegaze bent, which is what you'll get from single "Sad Wolverine" off the new EP and found below. The digital release of the album is said to be available soon, and we think it's a pretty cool coincidence that the band was able to time its release to match so perfectly with the weather, as this airy indiepop entry goes quite lovely with the light spring weather we've got in Austin right now. We suggest making Wildfires your spring soundtrack for all the hours of driving about looking for parking you're about to do this fest, so get listenin' and happy goddamn SX, y'all.

   

Ruby Rose Fox Plays Sell-Out Show at Atwood's, Launches Patreon Campaign For Upcoming Tour

This past Saturday (Pi Day, for any math fans who might be reading this), Ruby Rose Fox played a brilliant, sold-out performance in her return to Atwood's Tavern in Cambridge, MA. Clad in a gold-sequined jacket and wielding a matching gold telecaster, Ruby commanded the audience's attention on stage. Her shiny appearance wasn't what made her stand out that night though--it was her mesmerizing voice. Ruby's vocal performances have have generated substantial buzz around Boston recently, and for good reason. She possesses so much power and soul that when she sings, it's hard to do anything except stop whatever other unimportant thing you're doing and listen.
My favorite song from her set was her encore, a solo rendition of "Golden Boy," one of her more popular tunes. The choruses of that song were particularly impressive, with her voice reaching intense crescendos that drew loud whistles and applause from the crowd.

After generating so much hype in the city, she is finally preparing to hit the road in April, supporting Martha Davis and the Motels. As most people would probably assume, touring costs a boatload of cash, so she and her band have established a Patreon campaign to help raise funds for the trip. For every $2 donation, donors will receive exclusive "tour videos" shot by Ruby and her band as they travel around the States. Pretty cool perk for less than the cost of a pack of guitar strings.

For more info about Ruby and her upcoming tour, click here.

-Dan McMahon (@dmcmhn)
Photo credit: @lystenboston

 

   

Unwind with Saint Lou This Weekend

Friday nights were made for whiskey drinkin' and relaxin', so why not start your Friday evening early with a few tracks from Burlington, VT's Saint Lou? The group's latest EP, The Buffalo Tapes, is a great mix of folk/blues/50s doo-wop grooves. It's the kind of stuff that makes you want to pour a glass of whiskey, kick off your shoes and soak up the weekend. The band will be on tour for a few dates in April and May, with a smattering of gigs in Vermont and NYC.

For more updates about the band and their current shows, click here.

-Dan McMahon (@dmcmhn)

   

Letters to Toska Reflects Zoya's Rich Musical Background

Letters to Toska, the fourth EP from Zoya, could easily be classified as “indie-folk” or “singer-songwriter”, but none of those labels would even come close to describing what takes place on these tracks. This EP reflects a perfect blend of jazz, folk and R&B, while still finding room to inject some hints of Zoya’s South Asian heritage. These influences are prominently displayed on the track “Willows”, with its smooth guitar-work and hip-hop/soul-inspired melodies and cadences. With such a dynamic mix of inspirations, I expect Zoya’s songwriting will only continue to become more intricate and mesmerizing as she continues her musical career.

For more information about Zoya, click here.


-Dan McMahon (@dmcmhn)
Photo Credit: Jerome Vivino


 

 

   

Modern Melancholy with Caterwaulrus

If his music is anything to go by, Caterwaulrus is probably a nice dude to kick it with. He seems like he could be the kind that'd show up to a hang with some flowers he picked on his walk over, just for you, but who'd also be willing to tell you that he feels a bit weird about killing something pretty. That feeling of sunshine and good days with an underlying soft gloom just drips from the sound on songwriter's newest album, the just-released "Songs that Go Nowhere." That title is a bit misleading, but also a bit of the truth- these songs do float around like gentle clouds, but they're also dense and complex and there's nothing ambiguous about the way they hone in on their target tone. The album is laced with looping vocals all reverb-ed out to blissfulness, little electronic touches and pieces of beats, all of which melds together with no element ever threatening to overwhelm the rest of the track. And, despite the expansive warmth and haze in the sound, the sounds collectively bely the underlying subject of the tracks on the album, which almost all speak of Caterwaulrus' melancholy. Lyrics like "I'm so fucking picky and I over think god damn everything," or "I'm a synesthetic skeptic slowly snoozing with regret, it's not quite what mom expected" reveal a mind that is a bit worried and not always happy with itself, though it'd like to be, and that thought tunnels through the whole album. But, it's delivered in such a poppy (albeit highly experimental pop), major-key fashion, buried deep within the summer smile that is the overriding tone, that you barely notice that these aren't songs about having a good day at all. It's a modern feeling buried in a modern sound, and if you have enjoyed artists like Toro y Moi in the recent past, you might find Caterwaulrus a good fit for your modern moods. Give it a go below, and float through your own contemporary, confusing life with a friend in your ear who understands.