Folk/Country

Lila Blue boldly faces the end in new video "The Dead"

Perhaps the most entrancing element of “The Dead,” the latest video by New York songwriter Lila Blue, is the way in which it maintains a mellifluous air despite its various dark parks. Pervasive drone dominates the background as images of the artist somberly half-submerged in water inform the track’s visual component, yet Lila Blue’s lilting vocal performance, and lyrical defiance of looming death, endow the production with a celebratory energy.“If we don’t wake up in the morn, we’ll know that we passed boldly, fearless… rather than life whittling us down until we’re worn,” she sings, embracing both the end’s inevitably yet stressing the importance of a life well-lived. In this sense, “The Dead” resonates as a triumphant indie folk release, one that proposes a counterargument to the somewhat depressing conclusion to James Joyce’s novella of the same name, while maintaining a cooled atmosphere few within the genre can replicate. Watch it below, and stream the rest of Lila Blue's recently released LP Leave Me Be, out now.

   

Woundikin shines in gritty single "So It Goes"

This past April, Boston’s Woundikin released a gritty folk single that seems to float, smoky and soothing even. “So It Goes” lets its acoustic guitar arpeggios fly, and the lead vocals linger to form a melody that comes from reflection, understanding, and acceptance for the unknown things of this world, as beautiful as they can be. Woundikin, like many of us, is making the best of his time in quarantine and so we have this gift for the weekend ahead. Check out Woundikin’s Tiny Desk Contest 2020 performance of the song streaming below. - Rene Cobar

   

Liz Bills pays tribute to mothers in new single "Mama's Song"

Nothing stirs emotion quite like a serene country twang paired with honeyed vocals, both telling a story of gratitude and love, that is exactly what Liz Bills’ “Mama’s Song” does, and it does it so well. In the new music video for the song, photographs of families, and of course of mothers flash across as Liz contemplates through music and lyric the importance of being grateful for the sacrifices mothers make; those very sacrifices make tributes all the more necessary. Released yesterday to commemorate Mother’s Day, the brand new song is a message that hits home. Haverhill’s Liz Bills keeps things simple with delicate guitar string plucks and a vocal melody that is quite smile-inducing, quite fitting for a story to relate to. Stream “Mama’s Song below for a good start to the week. - Rene Cobar, photo by Carissa Johnson

   

Alan Scardapane tells his story in demo album "Winter House"

Putting a collection together of one’s work is no easy task, each piece is part of a greater story being told, and it must be told well. Boston’s Alan Scardapane does this brilliantly with his collection titled Winter House. Each track showcases Alan’s easy-going approach to music and serious melodic chops. Songs like “Camden Yards” drop you into a place of comfort: the music, with its lingering harmonies, and soft acoustic guitar plucks, flows like a cool river or a spring breeze you want to listen to, to breathe in, take in. “Without You” is folk-rock for the moodiest of days and the warmest summer evenings. Alan has collected his best tunes of 2014-16, and it shows; stream the edgy “Whiskey Girl” below for a proper weekend greeting. - Rene Cobar

   

The Collect Pond offers familiarity in new single "Traveling"

Boston's Danny Moffat (The Collect Pond) has been keeping busy alongside his acoustic guitar and soul-merging loops; his latest offering, “Traveling,”  is an ode to that which we hope for most at the moment: peace and familiarity. With a combination of gentle strums and relaxed-captivating vocals, Danny slows down the heartbeat, sharpens focus, and suspends you into a better reality. His indie folk track takes on a fun, fast-paced rhythm toward the end that is fitting, so pop-punk of him, a la acoustic that is, of course. Steam Danny’s latest track below for a mid-week mood uplift. - Rene Cobar