Hip Hop

Al Lover Gears Up to Release Zodiak Versions

The ever talented San Francisco producer and DJ, Al Lover is releasing a new album entitled, Zodiak Versions. He´s one of the best and brightest young mixologists and we´re always pleased to learn when his new music surfaces!

Zodiak Versions - a twelve track LP. The brain behind it, Al Lover, has said it best with his own words: It´s all about the groove! Hiphop, bass, kraut, rave culture, psych, dub, tribal music - it´s all there in Al Lovers universe. But that´s not the main point. Neither is the fact the he´s been compared to artists and producers like J-Dilla, Edan, Sun Araw and Gaslamp Killer. Or that some of his remixes includes artists like Goat and White Fence. The interesting part of Zodiak Versions is the entirety of the album. A fluid listening experience. The samples, looping and editing will make you zone out. Beats and ambient bliss for all the dubbed up heads out there!

Zodiak Versions will be released on vinyl/Digital world wide the27th of November through Höga Nord Rekords (Europe) and The Reverberation Appreciation Society (North America) But is available for pre-order today atshop.hoganord.com

   

I'm Here for the BOOs: Nashville's Halloween Playlist

Get tipsy off pumpkin beer? Check.
Watch Hocus Pocus and re-realize how awesome it is? Check.
Stress over the whole couples-costume thing? Check.
 

Create a totally badass Halloween playlist featuring some of my favorite local bands? CHECK.


Get in the spirit and give it a listen! -Caroline Bowman

 

   

'Koolin' at the End of Summer with Charlee Bankston x Deni

Emcees Charlee Bankston and Deni come harder and hotter than a patch of city concrete sittin' out in the Texas late-summer sun (we don't have fall here, but y'all know that) on new minimalist track "Koolin." This beat is built on just about nothin' else except a repeated oldschool rock 'n roll sample counting "One, two, three, four," a few snares, claps and bass beats and the full-court press vocals of Bankston and Deni, who take turns spittin' on the punchy beat. The rap here is allowed to be massively present due to the minimal beat, and it is some good damn rhymin' with an earworm hook, and it's hard to say whether the flow is the star for being so prominent and good, or if the boombastic beat is what makes it for providing so nice a frame for the emcees to do their thing over. Either way you wanna look at it, this hip-hop from Bankston and Deni is solid and catchy as fuck- the perfect thing to finish off the summer with a no-fucks-given bang. Get listenin'.

   

Album review: Bloodbirds - MMXIII

(Photo by Todd Zimmer)
 
Twenty-year veterans of the LFK/KC underground music scene, Mike and Brooke Tuley have played with a number of bands familiar to local rock audiences. Best known for their time with Ad Astra Per Aspera, they established Bloodbirds in 2011 with the intent of cutting loose and shaking things up.
 
And they have. Dense, dark—equal parts Fun House (Stooges), Spacemen 3 and Black Angels—Bloodbirds’ newest release MMXIII may also be their swan song, given the departure of bassist Anna St. Louis for Chicago. In some ways, it is St. Louis whose playing defines the band. Forward in the mix, and by no means shy, St. Louis plays with punchy authority, reminding of some of the other great “lead” bass players like Jon Entwistle and Peter Hook. Brooke Tuley is a powerful drummer; her parts are simple, but dead-on. She locks perfectly with St. Louis.  Mike Tuley plays on top of their aggressive foundation, a canvas for his arsenal of shimmering hammer-ons (“Modern Sympathy”), punishing riffs (“Did You Say”), and sometime dulcet tones (the comparatively clean Blue Mask jangle of “Convalesce”). Depending on the song, his sound can be metal harrowing or as ropey, surf-psychedelic as the theme from Repo Man.
 
About those songs: they’re functional, gripping, emotional soundscapes, not necessarily bound by pop hook conventions. They hit you with the shape-shift intensity of vintage heavy rock like Blue Cheer or modern darkness merchants like Black Rebel Motorcycle Club. Which is to say the focus here is not necessarily on hum-ability. Even allowing for that, it would be nice if the vocals had a dash less delay density and a bit more clarity in the mix. Lyrics and vocals on MMXIII are more about mood than meaning (or mood as meaning), stray lyrics emerging from the driving murk to arrest your conscious mind here and again.
 
The tough thump of “No Trains Coming Through” totally belies the song’s title. With Roky’s manic intensity, the song “Did You Say” features the ominous, repeated line “Did you say you want the end to come right now?” And the music echoes the sentiment. “Round Moon’s” cascade of guitar features some of Tuley’s most expressive fretwork, summoning up the incantations of bands like the Icarus Line and the guitar howl of the Stooges’ Ron Asheton. For an album that emphasizes a certain heavy-osity, MMXIII manages to shift mood and tone effectively.
 
Brothers and sisters, the Bloodbirds can make a show-stopping addition to anybody’s Psych Fest. Live shows may be few and far between, given the departure of St. Louis, but they have reunited in support of MMXIII occasionally and the members remain close friends and open to the odd gig. Go catch them if you have the chance.
 
—Steve Wilson
 

 

   

The Deli's NYC issue #44 is online!

Deli Readers,

I know, it seems like we put our latest issue out just the other day - but no, we haven't switched to monthly. It's just that the fall in NYC is a busy time for us, and with CMJ week and our NYC Synth Expo (linked to BEMF) coming up, there's a lot to write about.

Here's our 44th issue of The Deli NYC (one of our finest!). Check out cover band Stolen Jars, they'll be performing at one of the (several) Deli CMJ 2015 shows!

READ THE DELI NYC'S 44TH ISSUE HERE!

The Deli's Staff