newengland

Aunts crack and sizzle in new EP "The Last Great Place"

BOOM! POW! KABAM! That is how the music of Hartford’s Aunts cracks, and more so in their latest record The Last Great Place. “Open Space” erupts in such fashion that nothing is missing: from the revved-up electric guitars to the classic pop-punk screams that move in unison with the powerful rhythms of the track, all exists vivid as can be. “Canon” brews for a while, very hot and all, as it eventually pours out a furious drum pace sizzling. “Zihuatanejo,” an ode to the band’s last EP, lets the softer side of pop-punk show with sweet hooks that beg you join in. Overall the record is a refreshing listen for all who love this brand of alt-rock worth discovering time and time again; stream “Canon” below for a punchy good time. - Rene Cobar

   

Pomagranite explores the future in new record "Supply"

Alternative hip-hop has always been the main artery supplying the life of mainstream rap trends. So, if you are to look into the future, you may wish to appreciate Boston/NH rap group Pomagranite whose new record Supply has something refreshing and addicting in each track. The use of smooth-sinister electric guitar riffs in tracks like “Too Much” and “Linens” draw attention to pulsing drums and festive flows that combine bravado with street class. “Look at You” leans on R&B, but its cool hip-hop retains its grit and danger, using the collective performance as an unpredictable variable hard to resist. Pomagranite has a record to be proud of and a piece of knowledge about where hip-hop is going: the collective, and the experimental. - Rene Cobar

   

Mike Dubb is wacky-good in new single "Regular"

Some tracks just cannot be denied, and that is the case with Mike Dubb’s latest effort “Regular.” The new song, and accompanying visual, are wacky-good with a beat that is hard to resist and anime-style graphics that take the Boston-based artist from our reality into his own. It is in the fierce verses of the song where Dubb’s skill is showcased, flowing with a combination of fun and fury that is contagious as can be. “Regular” is short and sweet; the song makes a hard statement that this is a dude you want to keep an eye on. Stream “Regular” below for an unexpected but sick weekend firestarter, it will carry you through. - Rene Cobar 

   

Sprues & Runners offer an emo treasure in new EP "Trips To The Caribbean"

Emo music seems a rarity in the days of overproduced dream-pop hits, and so an EP like Sprues & RunnersTrips To The Caribbean takes on the form of a treasure chest found in a cove breezy with 2003 winds. The furious pace of “Red Teeth,” with its serrated screams and eruptive drums, comes after a curious serenity where surf-rock influences sway you gently, and then ultimately swing you violently. “The Opening” lets the instruments fly, and embraces that thin film of garage comradery that also propelled emo to the top of the charts oh not so long ago. There is no doubt that there are still treasures to be found out there in the sonic isles of the modern world, here is one that Providence’s Sprues & Runners are offering a clear map to. Listen to the euphoric breakdown in “Cactus” streaming below. - Rene Cobar

   

Liz Bills pays tribute to mothers in new single "Mama's Song"

Nothing stirs emotion quite like a serene country twang paired with honeyed vocals, both telling a story of gratitude and love, that is exactly what Liz Bills’ “Mama’s Song” does, and it does it so well. In the new music video for the song, photographs of families, and of course of mothers flash across as Liz contemplates through music and lyric the importance of being grateful for the sacrifices mothers make; those very sacrifices make tributes all the more necessary. Released yesterday to commemorate Mother’s Day, the brand new song is a message that hits home. Haverhill’s Liz Bills keeps things simple with delicate guitar string plucks and a vocal melody that is quite smile-inducing, quite fitting for a story to relate to. Stream “Mama’s Song below for a good start to the week. - Rene Cobar, photo by Carissa Johnson