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Farmertan debuts second act of sonic play "Muse of Fire"

Connecticut outfit Farmertan returns with the second act of its sonic play Muse of Fire, which enters a new chapter revved up and hot for noise. While the first act surely had its gritty rock moments, this second act kicks off with tracks like “Man of the Hour,” which sprints across its nearly four minutes of lingering-distorted chords, spirited drum fills, and oh-so subtle bassline with the velocity alternative rock demands. “The Storm” slows down some but is still powered by fuzzy guitar riffs and reverberated vocals that match the characteristics of the music; the guitar solo in the track is killer. “After” is the most melodic of the songs, gritty and fueled up still but with a cool strut to it that closes the act splendidly. Overall this continuation makes evident that this sonic play is well underway and that the last act is worth sticking around for; stream the second act below for a solid Tuesday playlist. - Rene Cobar

   

Delaney is not afraid to mix it up in new record "A Small Remaining Quantity of Something"

Manchester, New Hampshire, group Delaney has a new record that explodes with all the emocore goodness you desire for a celebratory weekend. A Small Remaining Quantity of Something contains tracks like “The Ghost of Better Times,” which pops with mighty harmonizing choruses, drum fills for days and even atmospheric breaks for a breather before the mosh madness. The group goes beyond the garage aesthetic with layered tracks like “Thief,” which add piano embellishments to back the melodic vocals, soaked in melancholy, and, yes, the song erupts too. “Broken” is no-holds-barred rock and roll, showcasing the versatility that has always made emocore a beloved and seemingly unforgettable music genre. For a weekend to remember stream A Small Remaining Quantity of Something below. - Rene Cobar

   

Stewie Grey emerges with re-release record "Out The Shadows"

Stewie Grey (formerly Greyhound) is barking for your attention with the re-release of his debut record, Out The Shadows, under a new name, but with the same bite. The tracks that propelled the Massachusetts rapper to the forefront of the New England hip-hop scene are there, such as the melodic “Dreamin’” and the disjointed “Out The Gate.” The record collects the best tracks of the artist and helps to redefine his persona by analyzing his work under a new light. Stewie Grey states the following: “I feel like Greyhound represents the old me. Not the confident me, but the intimidated me. The beginning of my journey. It’s not memorable either. The world will remember me as ‘Stewie Grey.’” Stream the new record below for a second look at an established artist. - Rene Cobar, photo by Sam Conley

   

Brevin Kim mines sonic gems with dual single release "i need water / he doesn't love her"

At the frontlines of the human-machine merging that music is currently experiencing is Boston duo Brevin Kim (Cal and Bren Paulhus), and the group shares the experience with its dual single release “i need water / he doesn’t love her.” Each single ventures to a place that represents each faction wholly: “i need water” drones and pounds away, with a distorted vocal flow machine-like; “he doesn’t love her” encapsulates wounded humanity, and the embers of love fanned by an electric guitar riff so warm. Brevin Kim explores with the tools of today, a world where emotion and resonance are deep within, and there is a great deal to mine, which it does well. Stream the dual singles here for a pair of gems very much of this age. - Rene Cobar

   

Hollow River has fun with confessions in new single "Known To Lie"

Mark MacDonald, also known as Hollow River, has released a single slippery-fun that flows beautifully and crashes with alternative rock power. “Known To Lie” has a turn-of-the-millennium sonic innocence to it, in the alt-rock, power pop style of groups like Smash Mouth: the music makes you feel good, maybe like partying. MacDonald flows in each verse with plentiful charisma and allows for revved up electric guitars to do the rest of the talking when the choruses arrive. For a summer hit, the music and its theme should be an anthemic escape from the weight of the prior seasons, “Known To Lie” fits that criteria. Another weekend arrives in an unusual 2020, stream “Known To Lie” to get through it with a gleeful smile. - Rene Cobar, photo by Sergio P.