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Robert Leslie takes it day-by-day on new track "Trying to Stay Alive"

It’s likely, during these very strange times, your mind is racing a mile a minute, trying to account for all the variables inherent just to just living throughout a generation-defining event. These thoughts inform the core of “Trying to Stay Alive,” the new single by indie pop artist Robert Leslie, which offers a pragmatic sketch of the mental gymnastics we all practice as we attempt to go about life as normal. Thankfully, Leslie’s evenhanded lyricism is offset by sunny acoustic strumming, upbeat walking bass, and muted horns, all of which provide a 70s-like energy that feels straight from the McCartney songbook. In all, it gives “Trying” with a triumphant energy, and makes for a small celebration of getting through another day — and isn’t that worth celebrating? Give it a listen below. Photo by Emmanual Rosario

 

   

From the Submissions: Jay Rosie's "Stay Late"

Shuffling melancholy abides on “Stay Late,” the new single by New York-by-way-of-Providence songwriter Jay Rosie, the type of track that feels rooted in sadness, yet focused on a bright, indeterminable future. Such energy comes in large part from its muted percussion and momentum-inducing acoustic strumming, endowing it with a soft rock sound reminiscent of Fleetwood Mac circa Rumours, or in more recent years, Faye Webster’s Atlanta Millionaires Club. Above this interplay glides Rosie’s vox, restrained at first yet increasingly emotive over the track’s chorus, wherein she details, in terms uncertain, pitfalls of codependency and the desire to not have to face the day’s trials on one’s own — a fitting subject matter in a time in which many are reaching out for a connection. Stream it below, and check out for Jay Rosie’s debut EP Soft but Not Weak, out now. —Connor Beckett McInerney

   

Iris Lune weaves through grief and loss on new track "Note to Self"

Mother’s Day can be a surprisingly reflective holiday — wherein we not only celebrate moms, but perhaps consider the necessary sacrifices inherent to parenthood. Songwriter Iris Lune commemorates her own late mother in new track “Note to Self,” released yesterday, in manners electronic and folky. A tactile, innovative indie pop single with elements evocative of Passion Pit, its instrumentals dramatically build to an explosive, emotive tribute, lyrically detailing grief and loss amongst punching drums and glittering synth. Such an effort serves well hidden nature of this past Sunday, and makes for a sentimental (and at times, soul stirring) listen; stream it below (and call your mom), and keep an eye out for Lune’s forthcoming LP lovelosslove dropping June 5th. Photo by Nir Aireli

 

   

PREMIERE: LUKKA's psych sound goes electro in new video "Feed Me"

“God keeps rushing through your fingers, as the hour of life slowly disappears.” Such cryptic statements are an old hat for New York psych performer LUKKA, who on new song “Feed Me” splits the difference between the metaphysical and tangible through an engrossing mix of electronic and psychedelic. Notably more synth-driven than the project’s 2018 debut ENCOUNTER, the track’s momentum is found in an abiding, lively arpeggio and strengthened by lush, echoing power chords evocative of outfits like Unknown Mortal Orchestra and POND. This blend keeps things grounded yet atmospheric, incorporating the right amount of psych headiness and keyboard-friendly indie; such instrumentation also provides the perfect space for LUKKA’s free-form lyricism, a spacey falsetto that modulates between themes empirical and spiritual (and which inevitably become entangled in the track’s later half). You can stream the track now, as well as watch its visuals (created by artists Simone Brillarelli and Nicola Giorgio) below.

   

Boot quietly tune out the chaos on new track "Bomb Song"

I described Boot’s self-titled EP from last year as an effort that focused predominantly on indoor drama — both the cozy and the stiflingly uncomfortable — so it’s fitting their new single would drop in the middle of an extended period spent inside. Predominantly acoustic (with some nice slide guitar accents noodling among the instrumentation), new track “Bomb Song” deals with a comfortable day at home upended by the news of an incoming missile, though its characters seem to take the news in stride, opting to cuddle, watch movies, and go to bed ahead of their immediate incineration. Such interactions seem par for the course for songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Benjamin Carbone; much in the same way the various premises of the tracks on 2019’s Boot are overshadowed by a focus on human behaviors, “Bomb Song” is able to set aside news of a forthcoming apocalypse and emphasize the much greater importance the people in our lives have in comparison. It’s a quiet soundtrack for human companionship, the type of sensitive songwriting that’s necessary during our very strange times — stream it below. —Connor Beckett McInerney