philadelphia

March CD of the Month: Born and Thrown on a Hook - Drink Up Buttercup

 
It’s all too common these days (and all too easy) to throw out descriptors like “60’s” or “Beatles-esque” or “psychedelic”, buzzwords that tend to say so much and so little at the same time. Drink Up Buttercup do fall pretty neatly into the 60’s psych-pop tradition in Philly that’s been prevalent over the past decade, so perhaps these buzzwords are practically unavoidable. But what’s also unavoidable is just how well these guys do what they do. The band has always made it quite clear that if a lot of people are doing the same thing, they’ll do it better, stronger, and with way more energy and gusto than most are capable of, and their debut full-length Born and Thrown on a Hook only cements this idea.
 
The opening track “Seasickness Pills” is the perfect introduction in the way that it offers a small taste of pretty much everything the album is going for. It’s alternately loud and soft, triumphant and spooky, and it culminates in those “carnival keyboards” that have become somewhat of a signature. The rest of the album follows suit somewhat, all of the tracks filled with bouncy, memorable pop hooks and awesome crescendos. No track just “sits there”, and the arrangements never dive into the “kitchen-sink” aesthetic that many bands of this type tend to indulge in (Horns! Strings!).
 
There are some highlights here, like the infectious lead single “Even Think” and the gypsy stomp of “Sosey and Dosey”, but it's more accurate to say that every song is a highlight. The greatest accomplishment of Born and Thrown on a Hook is that it works well as an album, with a definite flow and even some little instrumental tracks to divide it like chapters, but every song also works splendidly on its own. So while some might find the McCartney accent of the vocals a little forced or just not their style, one thing is obvious: this is a solid, well-crafted piece of work that will hold up to repeated listens. These boys have been blowing up recently, and my guess is they’ll continue to do so. Born and Thrown on a Hook is scheduled for release on March 23rd, 2010. myspace/drinkupbuttercupband - Joe Poteracki
 
   

Drink Up Buttercup

CD Name: 
Born and Thrown on a Hook
Music Link: 
http://www.myspace.com/drinkupbuttercupband
Album Cover URL: 
http://store.yeproc.com/view_image.php?filename=covers/210594244.jpg&maxsize=1&newxsize=450&newysize=450
body: 
<p>&nbsp;</p> <div>It&rsquo;s all too common these days (and all too easy) to throw out descriptors like &ldquo;60&rsquo;s&rdquo; or &ldquo;Beatles-esque&rdquo; or &ldquo;psychedelic&rdquo;, buzzwords that tend to say so much and so little at the same time. Drink Up Buttercup do fall pretty neatly into the 60&rsquo;s psych-pop tradition in Philly that&rsquo;s been prevalent over the past decade, so perhaps these buzzwords are practically unavoidable. But what&rsquo;s also unavoidable is just how well these guys do what they do. The band has always made it quite clear that if a lot of people are doing the same thing, they&rsquo;ll do it better, stronger, and with way more energy and gusto than most are capable of, and their debut full-length <i>Born and Thrown on a Hook</i> only cements this idea.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>The opening track &ldquo;Seasickness Pills&rdquo; is the perfect introduction in the way that it offers a small taste of pretty much everything the album is going for. It&rsquo;s alternately loud and soft, triumphant and spooky, and it culminates in those &ldquo;carnival keyboards&rdquo; that have become somewhat of a signature. The rest of the album follows suit somewhat, all of the tracks filled with bouncy, memorable pop hooks and awesome crescendos. No track just &ldquo;sits there&rdquo;, and the arrangements never dive into the &ldquo;kitchen-sink&rdquo; aesthetic that many bands of this type tend to indulge in (Horns! Strings!).</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>There are some highlights here, like the infectious lead single &ldquo;Even Think&rdquo; and the gypsy stomp of &ldquo;Sosey and Dosey&rdquo;, but it's more accurate to say that every song is a highlight. The greatest accomplishment of <i>Born and Thrown on a Hook</i> is that it works well as an album, with a definite flow and even some little instrumental tracks to divide it like chapters, but every song also works splendidly on its own. So while some might find the McCartney accent of the vocals a little forced or just not their style, one thing is obvious: this is a solid, well-crafted piece of work that will hold up to repeated listens. These boys have been blowing up recently, and my guess is they&rsquo;ll continue to do so. <i>Born and Thrown on a Hook</i> is scheduled for release on March 23rd, 2010. - <i>Joe Poteracki</i> - <a href="http://www.myspace.com/drinkupbuttercupband">Website</a></div> <p>&nbsp;</p>
   

Kill You in the Face at KFN Feb. 28

 
With a band name like Kill You in the Face, you’d think that you are about to hear some Norwegian black death metal. However, these South Philly self-proclaimed “all around nice guys” write music that seems to match their upbeat, sensitive demeanor. With the release of The Mighty Atlas - a six song EP that comes in the form of a toy ray gun, it's more likely that these Punk Rock Payroll family members will take aim at your heartstrings than your face. Kill You in the Face will be hosting Twin Thousands (Greta from Cursive’s new band) at Kung Fu Necktie tonight. Kung Fu Necktie, 1250 Front St., 7:30pm, $8, 21+ myspace.com/killfacephilly - H.M Kauffman

 

   

The Deli’s Featured Artist(s) of the Month: Controlled Storms

 
We caught up with our Featured Artist(s) of the Month and three-headed front Controlled Storms to find out a few facts and future plans for our local shoegazey ambient post rockers.
 
The Deli: When did you start playing together?
 
Controlled Storms: Steve and Brandon started playing together in early 2007, and our first show was in May at the Curiosity Shoppe (bike cops shut us down half-way through!) Ben started playing with us that October, just after we performed as part of Binding Sun at the Fringe Festival.

TD: What are your biggest musical influences, and what artists (local/national/international) are you currently listening to?
 
Our biggest collective influences are Tortoise, Brian Eno, David Byrne, Do Make Say Think, Tom Waits, and a bunch of Blue Note artists (Coltrane, Miles, Ornette Coleman, etc). Some of the Philly bands we're into are Cloud Minder, Infinien, Pink Skull, Levee Drivers... there are just too many to name. National artists? Tune-Yards is stunning (caught them at the Danger Danger Gallery - tons of soul) and El Ten Eleven (got a chance to play with them last year - one of the tightest live acts you'll ever see). As for international bands, Bassekou Kouyate & Ngoni ba, Jorge Ben, LITE, Samuel Jackson Five, and Aphex Twin.

TD: What's the first concert that you ever attended and first album that you ever bought?
 
Brandon - My first concert was Jane's Addiction with my 8th grade girlfriend. First album: Pink Floyd - Animals (wax), REM - Monster (cd). 
 
Ben - I don't remember my first album, but my first concert was definitely Tommy James and the Shondells with my Dad.
 
Steve - Oh whatever, I'll admit it, my first album was an Aerosmith cassette, and my first show was the Rolling Stone's Voodoo Lounge Tour when I was in 5th grade. Blind Melon opened...we missed 'em, go figure!
 
TD: What's your take on the Philly music scene?
 
CS: Some people say the only thing Philly has going is freak-folk, but if you look in the right places, there is an eclectic scene here - indie, hip-hop, instrumental, bluegrass, punk. The DIY ethic is thriving in Philadelphia, and it's the right-sized city to create a sense of community between artists. We love playing NYC, but it's a huge exhausting place, and we've played in cities that were struggling to build a scene because they were so small. In Philly, there's a lot of opportunity AND a lot of community. It's a beautiful place to make music.

TD: What are your plans for 2010?
 
CS: 2010 is looking like a busy year for us! We’re knee-deep in writing and recording right now, and we’ll soon be deciding how to release this batch of songs. It's shaping up to be either two full-length albums or multiple EP's. Either way, we hope to finish it all in time for a few weekend warrior jaunts before touring in August. 
 
TD: What was your most memorable live show?
 
CS: It has to be our Rooftop-Record-Release-End-of-the-Summer-BBQ-Bash on South St. Toy Soldiers, Power Animal and Controlled Storms set up in a circle around the audience and took turns playing one song at a time while the other two joined in with extra percussion and ambience. Later that night, we threw an after-party at the splendid Soul Purl 77 gallery with an even more chaotic set from each band. Philly is lucky to have Power Animal and Toy Soldiers making noise on its streets, and we were psyched to team up with them for our first record release show. It was a blast.
 
TD: What do you like to get at the deli?
 
CS: Three bagels with cream cheese (and a side of nachos).
 
 
(Photo by RA Friedman)
 
- The Deli Staff

 

   

Organ Blues and Mirador at North Star Bar Feb. 28

 
Organ Blues just came out with a powerful new release This Didn't Just Happen. The indie grunge three-piece have addictive songs that are reminiscent to Pavement and Modest Mouse, and already have Philadelphia Weekly dubbing them “Fishtown hetero life partners inspired by Philly Grit, who make bluesy, slightly grungy rock for space outs.” Not bad for just a few short months! Although on a different side of the spectrum, the progressive electronica stylings of Mirador have also gained some attention from us lately. The three demos from an upcoming EP collection tentatively titled Chapel all have a worldly and ethereal sound that feel like a walk through a mystical temple. When both bands play tonight’s show at North Star Bar, it should be an interesting ride. North Star Bar, 2639 Poplar St., 9pm, $8, 21+ myspace.com/organblues, myspace.com/echomenopolis - Bill McThrill